juried art show sponsored staunton augusta art center
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Juried Art Show sponsored by Staunton Augusta Art Center

saaclogoThe Staunton Augusta Art Center presents the Annual Juried Youth Art Show, mixed media by the best K-12 artists from public, private, and independent schools in Augusta County, Staunton, and Waynesboro.

The exhibit opens with a reception Sunday, March 2, 1-3pm in the artgalleries of the RR Smith Center for History and Art, 20 S. New Street in historic downtown Staunton.  Routine gallery hours are 10am-5pm Monday – Friday and 10am-4pm Saturday. The exhibit runs through March 29.  There is no admission charge to attend the reception or to visit the galleries.  Everyone is welcome.  For more information, call 540-885-2028.

In conjunction with the Annual Juried Youth Art Show and National Youth Art Month, the Staunton Augusta Art Center and Mary Baldwin College students present Saturdays-in-March classes for ages 6-10 years, 10:30am-Noon at the R. R. Smith Center, 20 S. New Street in historic downtown Staunton.   Pre-registration is required by calling 540-885-2028.  Cost per class: $15/$13members.

Through the theme of Tribal Art, participants will learn art techniques with a variety of mediums and will explore relevant cultures and geography.  Sign up for just one or all four!

 

Australia, Aboriginal Art, March 8

Dot painting nature or dreamtime scenes onto rock was one of the earliest art forms.     We’ll supply the rocks and the same colors the early Aborigines preferred: yellow (the sun), brown (the soil), red (desert sand), and white (clouds, sky).

 

India, Mehndi (applying henna), March 15

Long before our modern craze of tattoos, this ancient Indian art incorporated images of the sun to represent one’s inner as well as external light.  Our experienced henna artist will guide students in applying traditional images to the hands or feet (or paper, if preferred) with natural, non-toxic henna.

The Arctic, Inuit Shamanic Art, March 22

Animals, always highly respected, were usually the basis for this art and for the stories told by tribal religious leaders.  In the Inuit style, paint your own totem on paper and create a corresponding story.

 

Kenya, Kikuyu Face Masks, March 29

Face painting in this ancient African tribe was a serious matter and was used to beautify oneself or to terrify others in battle.  Follow the style of the Kikuyu and create a mask to convey beauty, bravery, boldness or more.

For more information, contact 540-885-2028 or [email protected]

Staff/Wire

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