Landes introduces higher-education reform bills

steve landesDel. R. Steven Landes, R-Weyers Cave, introduced two bills to enhance higher education in Virginia. The introduced legislation relates to invited campus speakers and the composition of the governing boards of public institutions of higher education.

“Our institutions of higher education should be a cauldron of free speech and expose our students to a variety of ideas,” said Landes. House Bill 1401 states that no public institution of higher education shall abridge the freedom of any individual, including enrolled students, faculty and other employees, and invited guests, to speak on campus. “This legislation will ensure our institutions of higher education encourage healthy debate and prevent censorship of contrary viewpoints or perceived controversial speech.”

Regarding the second reform bill, Del. Landes noted, “There is no shortage of qualified and deserving individuals in Virginia to serve in the leadership of our governing boards of higher education. This legislation will ensure that resident taxpayers serve in leadership and are accountable to the citizens they serve,” said Landes. House Bill 1402 requires each chairman, vice-chairman, rector, and vice-rector of the governing board of a public institution of higher education and each chairman and vice-chairman of each committee of the governing board of a public institution of higher education to be a resident of the Commonwealth.

Landes represents the 25th House District, which includes parts of Albemarle, Augusta, and Rockingham Counties. Landes is currently serving his eleventh term in the Virginia House of Delegates.

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