Monday, March 23, 2009

Economy: Remarks by President Obama after economy daily briefing, Monday, 5:15 p.m.
Civil Liberties: Sex Workers Art Show to go on, Monday, 5:15 p.m.
Education: Are you smarter than a fifth-grader?, Monday, 9:20 a.m.
Economy: Gas prices inching back up, Monday, 9:20 a.m.
Economy: AG’s office launches food drive, Monday, 9:20 a.m.
Education: Food and Farming Week at EMU, Monday, 9:20 a.m.
Local News: Waynesboro City Council meeting agenda, Monday, 9:20 a.m.
Local News: I-81 lane closures in Harrisonburg, Monday, 9:20 a.m.
Local News: VDOT road work schedule, Monday, 9:20 a.m. 

 

Economy: Remarks by President Obama after economy daily briefing, Monday, 5:15 p.m.

“As all of you know, we have been busy on a whole host of fronts over the last several weeks, with the primary purpose of stabilizing the financial system so banks are lending again, so that the secondary markets are working again, in order to make sure that families can get basic consumer loans, auto loans, student loans; that small businesses are able to finance themselves and we can start getting this economy moving again.

“As I’ve said before, there are a number of legs in the stool in the economic recovery. Step one is making sure that we had a stimulus package that was robust enough to fill the huge gap in demand that was created by the recession. Step two was making sure that we had a effective homeowners’ plan to try to keep people in their homes and to stabilize the housing market. Because of the work that’s already been done, you are starting to see glimmers of hope in the housing market that stabilization may be taking place. Mortgage rates are at a very, very low level, and you’re starting to see some activity in the housing market.

“We then took a series of steps to improve liquidity in what had been secondary markets that had been completely frozen. And we are now seeing activity in student loans and auto loans. We announced last week a small-business initiative that ensures that we have more activity and you start seeing small businesses being able to get credit again in order to sell products and services and make payroll.

“And this morning, Secretary Geithner announced the latest element in this multi-pronged approach, and that is a mechanism that he, in close consultation with the Federal Reserve and the FDIC, has initiated in order to allow banks to take some of their bad assets off their books, sell them into a market, but do so in a way that doesn’t just obligate taxpayers to buy at whatever price they’re willing to sell these assets; instead, involves a public-private partnership that allows market participants who have every interest in making a profit to accurately price these assets so that the taxpayers share in the upside as well as the downside.

“And we believe that this is one more element that is going to be absolutely critical in getting credit flowing again. It’s not going to happen overnight. There’s still great fragility in the financial systems. But we think that we are moving in the right direction. And we are very confident that, in coordination with the Federal Reserve and the FDIC, other relevant institutions, that we are going to be able to not only start unlocking these credit markets, but we’re also going to be in a position to design the regulatory authorities that are necessary to prevent this kind of systemic crisis from happening again.

“And I’m looking forward to traveling to the G20 so that we ensure that the activities that we’re doing here in the United States are effectively matched with comparable action in other countries. And Secretary Geithner has already traveled and met with the finance ministers of the G20 states so that we can make sure that we’re all moving on the same page.

“So the good news is that we have one more critical element in our recovery. But we’ve still got a long way to go, and we’ve got a lot of work to do. But I’m very confident that, with the team that we’ve got assembled, we’re going to be able to make it happen.

Editor’s Note: President Obama is scheduled to hold a nationally-televised news conference focusing on economic issues Tuesday, March 24, at 8 p.m.

 

Civil Liberties: Sex Workers Art Show to go on, Monday, 5:15 p.m.

Lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union of Virginia and the College of William and Mary have come to an agreement that will allow the controversial Sex Workers Art Show to go on as scheduled tonight. The show was nearly cancelled last year when college officials first delayed approval of the show and then imposed unusual restrictions on it.

The Sex Workers Art Show, or SWAS, is a collection of performance vignettes that explore the working conditions of individuals involved in the sex industry. In recent years, it has been performed on more than 100 college campuses across the country. Last year’s schedule included Duke, Harvard, the University of Michigan, and the University of Indiana.

“While certainly risqué and edgy, the Sex Workers’ Art Show is an event rich in images and messages about society, sex and work,” said ACLU of Virginia Executive Director Kent Willis. “It is precisely the kind of expression the First Amendment was intended to protect and that a university should be embracing, not suppressing.”

Although William and Mary President Taylor Reveley announced last month that he would not block this year’s show, the performance was threatened when school officials again imposed unusual restrictions not found in contracts with other performers.

As a result of the ACLU’s efforts, several changes were made to the contract, and the show will now go on as scheduled:

– The proposed contract required a moderator for the Q&A following the event. That restriction has now been lifted, and SWAS performers will now conduct the Q&A.

– The proposed contract prohibited the sale of merchandise by SWAS. Merchandise can now be sold in the auditorium where the event is being held.

– The proposed contract prohibited video taping of the event. Under the revised contract, SWAS will be allowed to videotape the program to use as a defense in the event that the College invokes an obscenity clause in the contract and refuses to pay.

– The proposed contract prevented SWAS cast members from attending after-show parties. The revised contract allows off-campus show parties after the event.

The five William and Mary student groups sponsoring the performance are Lambda Alliance, Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance, Tidewater Labor Support Committee, Meridian Coffeehouse, and Lips.

  

Education: Are you smarter than a fifth-grader?, Monday, 9:20 a.m.

Think the mayor isn’t any smarter than a fifth grader? How about your local weather forecaster? Your old professor?

Now’s your chance to see once and for all.

The James Madison University College of Education will host “Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader” featuring numerous local celebrities from the Shenandoah Valley and JMU communities at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 25, at the War Memorial Auditorium, Memorial Hall on the JMU campus.

Admission is $2 per person or $5 for a family, with proceeds benefiting the Reading Show Gus Bus.

 

Economy: Gas prices inching back up, Monday, 9:20 a.m.

After a slight decline last week, gas prices increased an average of three cents statewide last week, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic, settling at $1.94 a gallon for regular grade on Friday. Overall this month, prices have been relatively stable with only slight movement from week to week.

Crude oil prices surged 7 percent this week past $51 per barrel for the first time since January and closed at $52.07 Friday. Analysts attribute the increase to the Federal Reserve’s move to pump $1 trillion into the U.S economy, buying long-term government debt and expanding its mortgage bond purchases.

There was plenty of gasoline-related information released this week. According to the American Petroleum Institute, U.S. petroleum demand has shrunk to its lowest level in six years. Since February of 2008, total U.S. oil-product demand has fallen 3.9 percent. On Thursday, the Federal Highway Administration said motorists logged 7 billion fewer miles in January 2009, 3.1 percent less than the same period in 2008. Job cuts are part of the reason for decreased demand by American motorists, as a growing number no longer commute to work. In addition, the U.S. Energy Information Administration released data showing crude supplies rose more than expected to the highest level since June 2007.

Also this week, the Organization of the Petroleum exporting Countries announced production quotas would remain unchanged, believing that production cuts made last fall are beginning to have an impact on stemming falling gas prices. OPEC also forecasted a one million barrel per day decline in world oil demand in 2009, largely due to the slower global economy.

“Economic uncertainty continues to drive motorists away from the gas pump,” AAA Mid-Atlantic spokesperson Martha Meade said. “We typically see demand increase at the beginning of spring. However, with a record number of Americans out of work and consumer spending at record lows, this spring will likely be anything but typical.”

 

Economy: AG’s office launches food drive, Monday, 9:20 a.m.

Donations to Virginia’s food banks are down, and demand is hitting a record high. That’s the focus of this year’s “Legal Food Frenzy.” And the timing couldn’t be better. The Attorney General’s third annual “Legal Food Frenzy” aims to raise 1.5 million pounds of food for the hungry during the next two weeks.

Now in its third year, Virginia’s statewide food-and-funds drive by lawyers has become so popular that other states – including North Carolina, Indiana, New Jersey, Florida and Nebraska — may copy it.

According to Leslie Van Horn, executive director of the Federation of Virginia Food Banks, “The Legal Food Frenzy competition could not come at a better time. Food Banks throughout the Commonwealth are currently experiencing an historic surge in demand for assistance.”

The statewide competition pits law offices against each other. It starts Monday, March 30, and runs through April 10. It is open to all lawyers and members of the legal community across Virginia. Virginia law firms can sign up now by visiting www.legalfoodfrenzy.com.

Founded by former Attorney General Bob McDonnell, the benevolent contest raises food and funds for Virginia’s Food Banks during a traditionally slow period for donations. The “Legal Food Frenzy” is the first statewide food drive in the history of the Federation of Virginia Food Banks.

The competition was started in 2007 by the Attorney General’s Office, Virginia Bar Association and Federation of Virginia Food Banks. They based the idea on a similar regional event held every year since 1990 in Hampton Roads.

In the first year of the statewide “Legal Food Frenzy,” nearly 679,000 pounds of food were raised. That amount doubled in 2008, when more than 1.3 million pounds of food were donated, the equivalent of 1.1 million meals. Last year’s competition featured 181 law firms, ranging from sole proprietors to the largest firms in the Commonwealth.

The goal for this year’s 3rd annual “Legal Food Frenzy” is 1.5 million pounds. The law firm that raises the most food per capita wins “The Attorney General’s Cup.”

“In this economy, the role of the food banks has never been more crucial,” Virginia Attorney General Bill Mims said. “This is a great way for the legal community to give back, and this competition has become a tradition in the Virginia legal community.” Attorney General Mims has been personally kicking-off the competition this month at luncheons at law firms and food banks in McLean, Norfolk, Richmond, Roanoke and Charlottesville.

According to Greg Zoeller, Attorney General of Indiana, “With the success of Virginia’s first-in-the-nation statewide Legal Food Frenzy, we look to similarly partner with food banks to combat hunger. I hope our efforts in Indiana help take Virginia’s successful Legal Food Frenzy to the next level nationally.”

According to Roy Cooper, Attorney General of North Carolina, “During these difficult economic times, more and more families are turning to local food banks for help. To help meet this need, I’m pleased to work with North Carolina food banks and my state’s legal community to create a statewide food drive modeled after the successful Legal Food Frenzy in Virginia.”

According to Chris Gill of the Virginia Bar Association and Christian & Barton law firm in Richmond, “With the downturn in the economy sending so many more Virginians to the food banks’ shelves, the success of this project is even more important this year. The Virginia Bar Association is pleased to work with Attorney General Mims to challenge all Virginia lawyers to expand upon the tremendous efforts over the last two years.”

Last year’s winning firm was Schettine & Nguyen, PLC of Richmond, a three-lawyer firm that brought in 4,200 pounds of food per person. “As a small law firm, we were excited about the opportunity to make a positive impact on our community, and pleasantly surprised that we actually won ‘The Attorney General’s Cup,’” Jim Schettine said.

Van Horn, of the Federation of Virginia Food Banks, added, “We have always said that there are three faces of hunger – the working poor, children and senior citizens. But now there is a fourth face of hunger and one everyone knows – your neighbor, or a co-worker’s spouse, who has been laid off or their company has closed and they are unable to find a new job. The legal community in Virginia has been extremely generous during the first two years of the statewide Legal Food Frenzy and we know they are more excited than ever to help us make a difference to so many in need.”

 

Education: Food and Farming Week at EMU, Monday, 9:20 a.m.

Eastern Mennonite University will hold its annual “Food and Farming Week” Monday through Saturday, March 23-28.

Activities will open with a presentation 8 p.m. Monday in Suter Science Center room 109 on “food issues in Africa.” The presenter is Debbie Scott, who recently completed a three-year term of service in Nairobi, Kenya with Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa.

Ms. Scott served with ACORD, a pan-African organization working for social justice and equality. Her focus was on agricultural trade policy analysis.

Author Mark Winne will discuss his recent book, “Closing the Food Gap: Resetting the Table in the Land of Plenty,” 8 p.m. Tuesday in the Common Grounds Coffeehouse in the University Commons. Facilitating students are from Dr. Dan Wessner’s pre-law capstone course, “Law, Values and Worldview.”

Res Judicata, EMU’s pre-law student organization, is co-sponsoring the event.

A petting zoo will be set up on the front lawn of campus, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday. Bread baking will take place 7 p.m. that day in the Maplewood residence hall lounge.

Persons can meet 10 a.m. Saturday in front of the University Commons to bike or carpool to the Harrisonburg Downtown Farmers Market. A workday will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday in the EMU garden at the corner of Mount Clinton Pike and College Ave.

 

Local News: Waynesboro City Council meeting agenda, Monday, 9:20 a.m.

Waynesboro City Council will meet tonight at 7 p.m. in the council chambers of the Charles T. Yancey Municipal Building, 503 W. Main St.

The agenda for the meeting includes:

– Consent Agenda (any item placed on the consent agenda shall be removed and considered as a separate matter, if so requested by any member of Council, otherwise all items will be voted on with one (1) motion).

– Second consideration/adoption of an ordinance closing and vacating that undeveloped portion of Georgia Avenue as shown on the City Tax Map as being between Tax Parcels 17-3-H-1, Essers Addition (1501 Allison Avenue) and 17-3-F-11, Lyndberg Heights (1441 Georgia Avenue), Waynesboro, Virginia.

– Second consideration/adoption of an ordinance appropriating a $2,200 reimbursement received by Parks & Recreation to the General Fund for expenses related to rental of space at the Rosenwald Community Center by the City of Waynesboro Office on Youth for the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2009.

– Consider approving a proclamation naming Friday, March 27, 2009 as Bruce Payne Day in the City of Waynesboro.

– Receive a status report on the Waynesboro Library renovation project from Chuck Wray , BCWH Architects.

– Receive the Social Services annual presentation by the Director, Ms. Elizabeth Middleton.

– Hold a public hearing to receive public comments on the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) proposal to be submitted to the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development for the Arch/Market Avenue Housing Rehabilitation Project, and consider adopting a resolution authorizing the preparation and filing of an application for 2009 Community Improvement Grant funds through the Virginia Community Development Block Grant Program.

– Consider a request from the Virginia Fly Fishing Festival, Inc. to reserve Constitution Park, to sell alcohol, for amplified sound, and to create a pedestrian crossing at Main Street and McElroy Street, from 7:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, April 18 and 19, 2009 for the purpose of holding the Annual Fly Fishing Festival.

– Consider approving an application from Waynesboro Downtown Development Inc. for amplified music from 1:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m., alcohol sales, and specified street closures on Saturday, May 16, 2009 from 10:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. for the fourth annual Main Street Muscle Car Show.

– Consider approving a resolution allowing the City Manager to accept an easement from the Wayne Theatre for the installation and maintenance of fire suppression equipment for the Wayne Theatre.

– Consider adopting a resolution endorsing the Rail Preservation Application of Buckingham Branch Railroad Company for funding of certain improvements and procurements of railways in the Commonwealth.

– Consider the following ordinances:

– Appropriating a Project Graduation Grant in the amount of $9,090 to the Secondary Central Office Fund for expenses related to tutoring at the Waynesboro High School.

– Appropriating a $1,000 Mini-Grant from the Virginia Department of Fire Programs to the General Fund for expenditures related to computer hardware for the Fire Administration Division for the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2009.

– Appropriating a $295 reimbursement from a QCCI Grant received by Parks & Recreation to the General Fund for expenses related to a Child Care Training DVD for the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2009.

– Submission of the School Board’s Recommended Fiscal Year 2010 Budget.

– Boards and Commissions.

-Citizen Comment Period.

-Communication, Correspondence and Calendar.

 

Local News: I-81 lane closures in Harrisonburg, Monday, 9:20 a.m.

Lane closures will begin next week as part of a project to redesign traffic flow at the Interstate 81 exit 247 at Route 33 in Harrisonburg. On Route 33 one lane in each direction will be closed on March 25 and March 26 from 8 p.m. until 7 a.m. each evening. Beginning on March 30 the lane closures will continue Mondays through Thursdays from 8 p.m. until 7 a.m. each evening. The lane closure work will last approximately three weeks.

The project improvements include removing the cloverleaf northwestern loop, which is the on-ramp for traffic entering I-81 from Route 33 westbound lanes. In its place a 350-foot left-turn lane will be constructed on Route 33 near the existing southwestern ramp. At this location a new crossover and traffic signal will be installed, which will allow Route 33 westbound traffic to turn left to access southbound I-81 using a new short connector to the current southwest ramp. Eastbound Route 33 traffic entering the southwestern ramp will yield to vehicles entering the ramp using the new connector.

Additionally, the deceleration lane for traffic leaving southbound I-81 for Route 33 west will be extended 200 feet with an additional 180-foot taper. This will provide motorists using this I-81 off ramp more time to reduce their speed and enhance safety.

The project will improve the traffic pattern at the I-81 and Route 33 interchange at exit 247 in Harrisonburg. The interchange was constructed in the late 1950s in a cloverleaf configuration. Currently the I-81 southbound side of the interchange is experiencing twice the number of accidents as the northbound side. With this interchange configuration, the right I-81 southbound lane services traffic both exiting and entering Route 33, creating a weaving traffic pattern. This conflict point in the right I-81 southbound lane is the location of many traffic accidents.

 

Local News: VDOT road work schedule, Monday, 9:20 a.m.

Here is an updated list of highway work projects that might affect traffic in the Staunton Transportation District during the coming weeks. Work scheduled is subject to change due to inclement weather and material supplies. Motorists are advised to watch for slow-moving tractors during mowing operations. Also, when traveling through a work zone, be alert to periodic changes in traffic patterns and lane closures.

 

Rockbridge County

Interstate 64

* (NEW) Various roads – Cleaning ditches, drop inlets. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

 

Interstate 81

* (NEW) Various roads – Cleaning ditches, drop inlets. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

* Mile marker 195, eastbound and westbound – Roadway lighting construction. Shoulder closures, Monday to Friday, flagger traffic control.

 

Primary Roads

* Route 130 – Bridge construction at Route 501 in Glasgow. Periodic single lane traffic with flagger traffic control, Monday to Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Friday, 8 a.m. to noon. Completion is in September 13, 2010.

* (NEW) Various roads- Sweeping, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Flagger traffic control.

* Various roads – Litter pickup.

 

Secondary Roads

* Various roads – Brush cutting, shoulder work, sweeping. Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., flagger traffic control.

* Various roads – Grading dirt roads. Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

* (NEW) Various roads – Pothole repair, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mobile operation.

 

Augusta County

Interstate 64

No lane closures reported.

 

Interstate 81

* (NEW) Mile marker 205 to 237 – Litter and debris removal. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

* (NEW) Various roads – Cleaning ditches, drop inlets. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

 

Primary Roads

* Route 11, southbound (Lee Jackson Highway) – Sewer line installation from Route 694 to Route 701. Shoulder closure and lane shift, Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* (NEW) Route 340 (Crimora) – Speed limit reduced to 45 miles-per-hour from 0.29 miles south of the Route 663 intersection to 0.39 miles north of the Route 612 intersection. Estimated installation of new speed zone signs is Mar. 31.

* Route 340, northbound and southbound (Eastside Highway) – Alternating lane closures from Route 672 to 1340, with flaggers for stripping and pavement marking of left turn lane. Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

* Route 340, Waynesboro – Construction from Route 250 to Delphine Avenue for railroad bridge replacement and roadway widening, Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Expect minor delays from Broad Street to Sixth Street for construction work. Sixth Street closed for sanitary sewer replacement, Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Estimated completion is November, 2011.

* Various roads – Debris cleanup.

 

Secondary Roads

* (NEW) Route 608 – High shoulder removal from Route 796 to Route 254. Monday to Wednesday. Traffic control.

* Route 654 – Brush trimming from Route 800 to Route 11. Monday to Wednesday with flagger traffic control.

* Route 684, northbound and southbound (Little River Road, Craigsville) – Bridge replacement from Route 683 (Bashaw Road) to Route 685 (Lehigh Road). Road closed to thru traffic 8 a.m., Mar. 9 to 5 p.m., Apr. 3. Suggested detour: Northbound traffic take Route 683 west to Route 687 north to Route 684. Southbound traffic take Route 687 south to Route 683 east to Route 684.

* Route 701, westbound (Howardsville Road) – Sewer line work from Route 11 to Route 613. Shoulder closure. Work is 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. Flagger traffic control.

* Route 701 – Shoulder repair, Monday to Friday. Flagger traffic control.

* Route 792 – Mowing from Route 254 to Route 250 Monday to Friday. Mobile operations.

* (NEW) Route 796 – High shoulder removal from Route 608 to Route 254. Tuesday to Friday. Traffic control.

* (NEW) Route 815 – Pipe replacement from Route 11 to end of state maintenance. Monday to Friday. Flagger traffic control.

* Various roads – Mobile operation for machining dirt roads, Monday to Friday. Mobile operation.

* Various roads (Swoope) – Scraping. Signs will be posted.

* Various roads – Pothole repair, Tuesday to Wednesday. Mobile operations.

 

Rockingham County

Interstate 81

* (NEW) Mile marker 237 to 263, northbound and southbound – Litter and debris removal. Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 

Primary Roads

* (NEW) Route 11 (North Valley Pike) – Waterline installation from Route 765 (Gravels Road) and Route 963 (Windy Knoll Drive). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 11 (North Valley Pike) – Gas line installation between Route 718 (Old Furnace Road) and the Harrisonburg City Limits. Right shoulder closure, weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* (NEW) Route 33 (Market Street) – Safety upgrade at Route 33 and I-81 interchange. Shoulder closure, Monday to Tuesday, 7a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Single lane traffic on Route 33, Wednesday to Thursday, 8 p.m. to 7 a.m.

Route 33, eastbound and westbound,.

* Route 253 (Port Republic Road) – Sewer line installation from Route 704 (Osceola Springs Road) to Route 276 (Cross Keys Road). Westbound lane shoulder closure. Occasional single lane traffic with flagger traffic control. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 256 (Third Street, Grottoes) – Commercial entrance and directional bores from Route 825 (Dogwood Avenue) and Forest Avenue. Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 257 (Mason Street, Dayton) – Entrance construction from Route 1204 (Ashby Street) to Route 1203 (Westview Street). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 259 (Brocks Gap Road) – Directional bore. Work is from Route 820 (Bergton Road) to West Virginia State line. Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 276, eastbound (Cross Keys Road) – Sewer line installation from Route 33 (Spotswood Trail) to Route 253 (Port Republic Road). Shoulder closure. Occasional single lane traffic with flagger traffic control. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

Secondary Roads

* Route 641 (Cave Hill Road) – Road work from Route 843 (Cemetery Road) to Route 991 (Jacob Burner Road). Intermittent lane closures. Flagger traffic control. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 676 (Oak Shade Road) – Directional bore. Work is from Route 276 (Cross Keys Road) to Route 674 (Duck Run Road). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 679 (Pleasant Valley Road) – Sewer line installation from Route 689 (Spaders Church Road) to Route 898 (Pleasant Drive). Shoulder closures controlled by flaggers. Blasting may occur. Work is Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 689 (Shen Lake Drive) – Sewer line installation from Route 253 (Port Republic Road) to Route 1003 (Cumberland Drive). Westbound shoulder closure. Occasional single lane traffic with flagger traffic control. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 689 (Shen Lake Drive) – Sewer line installation from Route 253 (Port Republic Road) to Route 1030 (Lucy Long Drive). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Motorists should use caution and expect delays, especially at the intersection of Route 689 and Route 253.

* Route 704 (Cecil Wampler Road) in conjunction with Route 679 work – Sewer line installation from Route 679 (Pleasant Valley Road) to Route 704 (Cecil Wampler Road). Occasional blasting may occur. Shoulder closure. Single lane traffic controlled by flaggers. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 704 (Cecil Wampler Road) – Sewer line work from Route 679 (Pleasant Valley Road) to Route 705 (Cottontail Trail). Shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 709 (Autumn Lane) – Sewer line installation from Route 704 (Osceola Springs Road) to Route 710 (Greendale Road). Westbound shoulder closure. Occasional single lane traffic with flagger traffic control. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 710 (Greendale Road) – Aerial crossing from Route 253 (Port Republic Road) to Route 709 (Autumn Lane). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 726 (Stone Spring Road) – Aerial crossing from Route 253 (Port Republic Road) to Route 726 (Peach Grove Avenue)/Harrisonburg City Limits. Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 794 (Canery Island Road) – Overhead line installation from Route 11 (North Valley Pike) and Route 620 (Mount Valley Road). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 820 (Crab Run Road) – Aerial line installation from Route 865 (Bergton Road) to West Virginia State line. Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 826 (Criders Road) – Aerial line installation from Route 820 (Bergton Road) to Route 700 (Trailer Park Road). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 865 (Bergton Road) – Aerial line installation from Route 820 (Bergton Road) to Route 823 (Overly Hollow). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 996 (McGaheysville Road) – Boring between Route 842 (Slate Road) and Route 998 (Fairyland Lane). Right shoulder closure, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 1204 (Ashby Street) – Waterline installation from Route 1209 (Thompson Street) to Route 1201 (Turner Street). Shoulder closure. Occasional single lane traffic with flagger traffic control. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

* Route 1304 (Sunset Drive, Dayton) – Sewer line installation from Route 257 (Mason Street) to Route 1209 (Thompson Street). Road closed. Flagger traffic control, Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.


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