Radio ads target negative impacts of pipelines on rural communities

The Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League has launched a two-state radio ad campaign centering on the risks of natural gas pipelines on rural communities.

pipelineThe League targeted communities along the Mountain Valley Pipeline route in southwestern Virginia and the Atlantic Coast Pipeline route which extends across eastern Virginia and North Carolina.  The ads targeted poor safety standards and reduced property values.

The League’s three-year investigation into pipeline impacts provided the foundation for the radio ad claims.  For example, federal pipeline construction and safety standards allow less robust pipe, half the thickness required in urban areas.  Gas transmission shut-off valves are twice as far apart, increasing the time and difficulty for emergency responders.  And independent analysis by real estate experts indicates up to a one-third loss in property values where pipelines are located.

“Most of the pipeline miles would be located in rural areas, and that’s where we find clearly more negative impacts,” said Louis Zeller, executive director of Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League.  He continued, “Residents in these communities deserve equal protection, but they are relegated to second-class status by unfair pipeline standards.”

The League has organizing communities all along the proposed pipeline routes, and interviewed residents, farmers and landowners about their views.

Objecting to the huge difference in safety standards between urban and rural pipelines, Frank McManus said, “Thinner pipe, fewer shutoff valves put our families in grave danger…a danger we shouldn’t have to endure.” McManus is a member of Protect Our Water in Nelson County, Virginia.

Marvin Winstead, leader of Nash Stop the Pipeline in North Carolina, opposed the huge losses in property values that pipelines can cause.  He said, “Pipeline companies would profit at landowners expense. It’s just not fair.”

The ads call for people to contact their elected officials at every level to take steps to protect rural residents.

The ad campaign begins this week.

Subscribe

Augusta Free Press content is available for free, as it has been since 2002, save for a disastrous one-month experiment at putting some content behind a pay wall back in 2009.

(We won’t ever try that again. Almost killed us!)

That said, it’s free to read, but it still costs us money to produce. The site is updated several times a day, every day, 365 days a year, 366 days on the leap year.

(Stuff still happens on Christmas Day, is what we’re saying there.)

AFP does well in drawing advertisers, but who couldn’t use an additional source of revenue?

From time to time, readers ask us how they can support us, and we usually say, keep reading.

Now we’re saying, you can drop us a few bucks, if you’re so inclined.

Click here!


News From Around the Web


Shop Google






Comments