WVPT celebrates first-time network broadcast female co-anchors

afp_wvptWVPT, the PBS station that serves the Shenandoah Valley and Central Virginia, is pleased to share that PBS NewsHour will be the first network broadcast in history to welcome two female co-anchors in September.

Yesterday, PBS announced Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff will be co-anchors and managing editors for the broadcastMonday through Thursday. On Fridays, Woodruff will anchor as Ifill hosts Washington Week.

“WVPT is honored to be part of a national organization like PBS that breaks new ground like this,” said WVPT President and General Manager David Mullins.

“Through the years, the PBS NewsHour has provided a unique presentation of national and international news as an anchor to WVPT’s program schedule,” said Mullins. “While other news organizations focus on breaking news, the PBS NewsHouris the place to come to learn why the news matters—and that’s critically important.”

Linda Winslow, executive produce for PBS NewsHour, said in a statement yesterday that this marks an exciting new chapter in the history of the broadcast.

“Gwen and Judy have been the heart and soul of NewsHour for years, so it’s wonderful to formalize these new roles and give them an opportunity to provide even more input on the content and direction of the show,” Winslow said.

PBS also announced that Hari Sreenivasan will serve as Senior Correspondent for the PBS NewsHour, reporting from WNET’s Tisch Studios in New York, along with anchoring the PBS NewsHour Weekend—a new program premiering Sept. 7—on Saturdays and Sundays.

In addition, three new PBS NewsHour correspondents were announced: Jeffrey Brown was named Chief Correspondent for Arts, Culture and Society; Ray Suarez was named Chief National Correspondent; and Margaret Warner was named Chief Foreign Correspondent.

Viewers can watch PBS NewsHour, weeknights at 6 p.m. EST, and PBS NewsHour Weekend, Saturdays and Sundays at5 p.m. EST, on WVPT.


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