Why rodents get into homes during the fall?

rodents

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Nobody likes a rodent infestation. These pests gnaw at your furniture, spread diseases, and stink up the place. They even reproduce like crazy, so getting rid of them can be a challenge that is usually best left to professionals like those at northeastwildlifesolutions.com. Unfortunately, you’ll be at risk of a rodent infestation every fall. But why is that?

Rodents Need Warmth

As the summer passes and the weather starts getting colder and colder, you’ll probably be wearing thicker coats and jackets. Animals are no different. While they may have their fur and can survive the fall without much trouble, they’re constantly looking ahead to winter. The constant snow, cold winds, and freezing temperatures are guaranteed to kill any rodents out in the open.

That’s why rodents need to find somewhere warm while they still can. Plenty of these animals will find dens or create their own burrows in nature during this time. Others, however, will stumble upon your home. While burrows and dens can reduce the effect of the cold, there’s nothing like a well-insulated home with good heating. As a result, the rodents who accidentally find their way to your home will realize that they won’t be able to find a warmer spot out in nature. That’s when they’ll decide to stick around and wreak havoc.

Rodents Need a Safe Place to Raise Their Young

Animals and people alike want what’s best for their kids. A large part of that means raising their young in a good, warm, and safe environment. Rodents are no different.

Just think about it. During the fall, all animals are preparing for the winter. They’re either trying to find a safe spot to live or they’re out gathering food for the winter. A rat may be annoying, but it’s at the bottom of the food chain. That means staying outside during the fall will probably result in it being killed by the weather or eaten by other animals. There’s no way to stay alive to raise their young that way.

Your home, however, is a different story. While you’ll inevitably get rid of them, the rodents still get to enjoy a few days, weeks, or months of peace before you become aware of their presence. That’s plenty of time to give birth to and raise several litters of rodents.

In addition to the safety from predators, your home also gives rodents a warm place to raise their young. It’s important to note that mice and rats give birth to tiny, hairless children. If dealing with an infestation, it’s vital to know how to tell the difference between them.

Another thing your home offers is plenty of cover. There are lots of places for rodents to hide thanks to all the drywall, furniture, and items lying around. This resembles a rodent’s natural habitat and makes them feel safer, which is why they’re likely to spend the fall and winter with you.

Rodents Need Food

Winter is a difficult time for animals. With most plants dying and most animals going into hiding, there’s very little you can find to eat. As a result, plenty of animals get all their needed food during the fall and stockpile for the winter.

Rodents do the same thing. While they’re usually opportunistic feeders – meaning they’ll eat whatever they come across – they tend to become more aggressive in their search for food during the fall. They’ll start specifically going out in search of food that’ll keep their bellies full during the harsh winter.

These animals probably jump with joy when they find your home. Not only is there plenty to eat – from the garbage can, garden, and groceries left around – but the food never seems to end. As a result, they’ll happily shack up with you during the fall.

Getting Rid of Rodents

While rodents may see your home as paradise thanks to the seemingly endless warmth, safety, and food they can find there, you just don’t want them there. That’s why you should call a professional to help sort out any rodent problems you’re dealing with. For more information on how to deal with a rodent infestation, visit this website.


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