Waynesboro city school system: Misplaced priorities

After SchoolLast week, Waynesboro Public Schools had the Waynesboro Police Department on campus at Waynesboro High School for a sweep of the parking lot.

‘Twas a drug bust the school system was instigating.

“I think it just raises awareness that we don’t tolerate drug use on campus,” Waynesboro Public Schools Superintendent Jeff Cassell told News Virginian editor Brian Carlton.

“It’s holding people accountable.”

Here’s holding people accountable: according to police spokesperson Brian Edwards, K-9 units alerted on eight student vehicles, and after searches one of the eight was found to have drug paraphernalia inside.

There are a couple of good lessons there for the kids to take home with them. One, for government class, regarding how much we now tolerate living in a police state in the name of “holding people accountable.”

Two, for math class. One in eight isn’t what you’d call a good success rate for the K-9 units.

That’s 12.5 percent, for those keeping score at home.

OK, so here’s a number for you: more than 60 percent of the kids in our school system are on free or reduced lunch.

And here’s another: 5.4 percent. That’s how much, or how little, depending on your perspective, the school system annual budget has grown since the first year of the recession, in 2008.

City leaders have continually asked, forced, the school system to do more to educate our kids with their myriad disadvantages with less.

And the folks in the school system are choosing to put their efforts into obviously ineffectual drug busts.

Some people need to be held accountable, to be sure.

– Column by Chris Graham

Subscribe

Augusta Free Press content is available for free, as it has been since 2002, save for a disastrous one-month experiment at putting some content behind a pay wall back in 2009.

(We won’t ever try that again. Almost killed us!)

That said, it’s free to read, but it still costs us money to produce. The site is updated several times a day, every day, 365 days a year, 366 days on the leap year.

(Stuff still happens on Christmas Day, is what we’re saying there.)

AFP does well in drawing advertisers, but who couldn’t use an additional source of revenue?

From time to time, readers ask us how they can support us, and we usually say, keep reading.

Now we’re saying, you can drop us a few bucks, if you’re so inclined.

Click here!


News From Around the Web


Shop Google






Comments