first bank  

Virginia Cooperative Extension honors Outstanding Farmer, Volunteer, Agent of the Year

Michael Carter Jr.
Michael Carter Jr., state program assistant for SFOP, was named the Small Farm Agent of the Year. Photo courtesy Virginia Cooperative Extension.

The Virginia Cooperative Extension Small Farm Outreach Program at Virginia State University has honored Michael Carter Jr. as its Small Farm Agent of the Year.

Carter was honored along with the selections for 2020 Andy Hankins Small Farmer of the Year and Volunteer of the Year at a virtual ceremony held Jan. 27.

Carter is coordinator for the Virginia Small Farm Resource Center, an online platform that connects farmers and ranchers to resources and tools that help their farm operations become profitable and sustainable.

Carter is an 11th generation farmer and operates Carter Farms in Orange County, which has been in his family for over 100 years. He raises ethnic vegetables and often gives workshops on growing African produce that help educate and raise cultural awareness in the agriculture industry.

Carolyn Quinn, owner of Dug In Farms in White Stone, was the recipient of the Andy Hankins Small Farmer of the Year award. Quinn began farming six years ago after moving from Washington, D.C. where she worked as a lobbyist.

She raises vegetables, cut flowers and runs a farmers market on her farm. Quinn grows produce year round in two high tunnels she received through a program funded by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Sheila Jackson was named the Volunteer of the Year for her work with the Minority and Veteran Farmers of the Piedmont, a grassroots non-profit farming organization that works with the SFOP and maintains community gardens at the George Washington Carver Agricultural Research Center in Rapidan, Virginia. Jackson maintains a thriving herb garden at the center.

William Crutchfield, SFOP director, said that each of the winners are deserving of the awards because of their commitment to agriculture and to their communities.

“Without dedicated and hardworking individuals like these supporting our programs, SFOP could not be a success,” Crutchfield said. “These individuals are giving their time and talents to not only support our programs, but also support their communities through their farming efforts and support of food banks and farmers markets.”


augusta free press news
augusta free press news


Comments