Robert Sarvis on the debate: ‘A complete farce’


You can forgive Robert Sarvis for being a bit bitter. Sarvis is on the ballot for governor as the Libertarian Party nominee, he’s polling 10 percent or above in most polls, and yet he was strong-armed out of a slot in the final gubernatorial debate of the 2013 election cycle because, well, because he’s not a Democrat or Republican.

robert sarvisSarvis, of course, was watching, unlike most of you.

His assessment: “The debate didn’t offer much value for voters. This is what two men without ideas or depth look like.”

Now the question is, how much of Sarvis’ 10 percent might peel off to either Democrat Terry McAuliffe or Republican Ken Cuccinelli, or … can Sarvis continue building his base and play even more of a spoiler role?

It’s hard to imagine him catching lightning in a bottle and winning the thing.

One reason for that is how Sarvis has been treated as an interloper in the race at just about every step.

“We’ve allowed our political system to become closed off from competition and good ideas, by letting the major-party candidates choose the terms of debate and exclude candidates like me,” Sarvis said.

“It’s long past tragedy. It’s become a complete farce.”



uva basketball team of destiny

Team of Destiny: Inside UVA Basketball's improbable run

Team of Destiny: Inside Virginia Basketball’s Run to the 2019 National Championship, by Jerry Ratcliffe and Chris Graham, is available for $25.

The book, with additional reporting by Zach Pereles, Scott Ratcliffe and Scott German, will take you from the aftermath of the stunning first-round loss to UMBC in 2018, and how coach Tony Bennett and his team used that loss as the source of strength, through to the ACC regular-season championship, the run to the Final Four, and the thrilling overtime win over Texas Tech to win the 2019 national title, the first in school history.

Subscribe

Augusta Free Press content is available for free, as it has been since 2002, save for a disastrous one-month experiment at putting some content behind a pay wall back in 2009. (We won’t ever try that again. Almost killed us!) That said, it’s free to read, but it still costs us money to produce. The site is updated several times a day, every day, 365 days a year, 366 days on the leap year. (Stuff still happens on Christmas Day, is what we’re saying there.) AFP does well in drawing advertisers, but who couldn’t use an additional source of revenue? From time to time, readers ask us how they can support us, and we usually say, keep reading. Now we’re saying, you can drop us a few bucks, if you’re so inclined.

 


augusta free press
augusta free press
augusta free press news