Quinnipiac poll: Swing-state voters disapprove of Obama, want un-vaccinated kids kept out of school

economic-forecast-headerVoters in three critical swing states, Colorado, Iowa and Virginia, disapprove by margins of 9 percentage points of the job President Barack Obama is doing, according to a Quinnipiac University Swing State Poll released this week.

By even bigger margins, voters want the next president to change directions from President Obama’s policies, the independent Quinnipiac University Poll finds.

The Swing State Poll focuses on key states in the presidential election.

The president gets negative job approval ratings in all three states:

  • 43 – 52 percent in Colorado
  • 43 – 52 percent in Iowa
  • 44 – 53 percent in Virginia.

Voters support by wide margins, Obama’s proposal to increase taxes on higher income earners to reduce taxes on the middle class. By smaller margins, voters in each state oppose the president’s proposal to provide free community college tuition.

“Events change and issues move on and off the front-burner, but President Barack Obama’s job approval stays relatively the same – low. In the critical Swing States of Colorado, Iowa and Virginia the president’s job approval rating is in the low to mid 40s,” said Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac Poll. “That’s about where it has been for most of the last few years.

“By margins of 24 points or higher, voters say they want the next president to change direction and not follow President Obama’s policies. Whether that desire for a new direction will hurt the eventual Democratic nominee in 2016, time will tell.”

“One reason for this seems to be that while voters in all three states say their state economy is excellent or good, and many say their personal financial situation is improving, more think Obama’s policies have hurt rather than helped the economy,” Brown added.

“At this point the president is not getting much credit for the improving economy.”

“There is strong agreement – by more than 2-1 in these states – on the need to ban from public schools children who have not been vaccinated against childhood diseases such as measles.”

 

Colorado

Colorado voters say 60 – 29 percent that children who do not receive standard vaccinations should not be allowed to attend schools or childcare facilities. There is almost no gender gap, but parents of children under 18 years old support a ban on un-vaccinated children by a smaller 53 – 39 percent margin.

Voters say 58 – 34 percent they want the next president to “change direction from Barack Obama’s policies.”

A total of 69 percent of voters are “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the way things are going in the state and 76 percent say the state’s economy is “excellent” or “good.”

Colorado’s economy is getting better, 54 percent of voters say, and 48 percent say they are better off than they were a year ago.

But voters say 42 – 38 percent that Obama’s policies have hurt rather than helped the U.S. economy and say 40 – 21 percent that his policies have hurt rather than helped their personal financial situation.

Colorado voters support 57 – 37 percent Obama’s proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy and use the money to reduce taxes on the middle class.

By a narrow 49 – 46 percent margin, voters oppose the president’s plan to offer free community college tuition.

A total of 78 percent of voters are “very worried” or “somewhat worried” about the rise of Islamic extremism and 71 percent are “very worried” or “somewhat worried” about a terrorist attack in the U.S.

The federal government should investigate terrorist threats, even if it means intruding on personal privacy, Colorado voters say 50 – 41 percent.

 

Iowa

Children who do not receive standard vaccinations should not be allowed in schools or childcare facilities, Iowa voters say 64 – 28 percent. Women support such a ban 69 – 22 percent, while men support it 58 – 34 percent. Parents of children under 18 years old support a ban on un-vaccinated children 58 – 37 percent.

Voters say 58 – 34 percent they want the next president to “change direction from Barack Obama’s policies.”

A total of 77 percent of voters are “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the way things are going in the state and 76 percent say the state’s economy is “excellent” or “good.” Iowa’s economy is getting better, 33 percent of voters say, while 12 percent say it is getting worse and 53 percent say it’s about the same. They are better off than they were a year ago, 45 percent of voters say.

But voters say 42 – 38 percent that Obama’s policies have hurt rather than helped the U.S. economy and say 32 – 19 percent that his policies have hurt rather than helped their personal financial situation.

Iowa voters support 64 – 30 percent the president’s proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy and use the money to reduce taxes on the middle class.

Voters oppose 55 – 40 percent Obama’s plan to offer free community college tuition.

A total of 85 percent of voters are “very worried” or “somewhat worried” about the rise of Islamic extremism and 77 percent are “very worried” or “somewhat worried” about a terrorist attack in the U.S.

The federal government should investigate terrorist threats, even if it means intruding on personal privacy, Colorado voters say 59 – 31 percent.

 

Virginia

By an overwhelming 71 – 22 percent margin, Virginia voters say un-vaccinated children should not be allowed in school or child care. There is almost no gender gap and parents of children under 18 years old agree with the ban 68 – 28 percent.

Voters say 61 – 31 percent they want the next president to “change direction from Barack Obama’s policies.”

A total of 63 percent of voters are “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the way things are going in the state and 65 percent say the state’s economy is “excellent” or “good.”

Virginia’s economy is getting better, 30 percent of voters say, while 14 percent say it is getting worse and 54 percent say it’s about the same. They are better off than they were a year ago, 42 percent of voters say.

But voters say 45 – 39 percent that Obama’s policies have hurt rather than helped the U.S. economy and say 38 – 19 percent that his policies have hurt rather than helped their personal financial situation.

Virginia voters support 56 – 39 percent the president’s proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy and use the money to reduce taxes on the middle class.

Voters oppose 51 – 45 percent Obama’s plan to offer free community college tuition.

A total of 84 percent of voters are “very worried” or “somewhat worried” about the rise of Islamic extremism and 80 percent are “very worried” or “somewhat worried” about a terrorist attack in the U.S.

The federal government should investigate terrorist threats, even if it means intruding on personal privacy, Colorado voters say 62 – 30 percent.

From February 5 – 15 Quinnipiac University surveyed:

  • 1,049 Colorado voters with a margin of error of +/- 3 percentage points;
  • 1,089 Iowa voters with a margin of error of +/- 3 percentage points;
  • 1,074 Virginia voters with a margin of error of +/- 3 percentage points.


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