JMU students to test skills developing special ops equipment at Fort Bragg


james madison university jmuThe design for the next innovation in high tech sleuthing equipment could come from a group of James Madison University students who will spend the first 24 hours of their spring break Saturday participating in a special pilot hackathon-style event at the Joint Special Operations Command at Fort Bragg, NC.

The competition was developed jointly by JMU X-Labs and the staff of JSOC as a means of auditioning the next generation of specialized equipment.  Three four-person teams from JMU were selected to attend along with a similar group from Virginia Military Institute.  High-performing students could receive a paid summer internship with JSOC.

Among its many roles, JSOC develops cutting-edge innovations not unlike the gadgets that the character “Q” makes in the James Bond movies. During the competition, students will have 24 hours to rapidly develop a technical solution to a challenge.  The event is designed to simulate real-world challenges with a bit of stress and a few surprises built into the weekend.  During the process, the students will be evaluated and top candidates will be offered summer internships.

With its transdisciplinary courses, JMU X-Labs aligns higher education with industry needs and develops creative, confident and market-ready leaders who are experienced in emerging technologies.



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