Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley grant to increase supports for children

Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah ValleyBrain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley received an award to expand pediatric case management services for individuals affected by brain injury throughout Rockingham, Augusta, Page, Shenandoah, Highland, Bath and Rockbridge counties, and the cities located within.

The three-year grant from the Commonwealth Neurotruama Initiative (CNI) Trust Fund is administered in cooperation with the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS).

Brain injury is the most frequent cause of disability and death among children in the United States. Children aged 0-4 years and adolescents aged 15-19 years are more likely to sustain a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) than any other age group, according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

DARS Commissioner Kathryn Hayfield commented that, “For many years, Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley has done an exceptional job of providing specialized brain injury services and supports to adults within their service area. It is commendable that the leadership of BICSV will now address this need among children and youth affected by brain injury. DARS is confident that this three-year grant project will successfully build an effective pediatric program in the Shenandoah Valley to ease the way for families facing an often life-altering injury.”

Since the brain continues to develop until age 25, a child’s brain injury may have consequences years later. Linda Meyer, Ph.D., CCC-SLP and President of the Board of Trustees stated, “Scientists and researchers believe that rather than “growing out” of their injuries, children may “grow into” them, experiencing increased symptoms over time. Due to this, pediatric cases involve coordination with multiple agencies, including school systems.”

Tamara Wagester, Executive Director for Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley, stated, “Over the last year, our organization doubled our number of pediatric inquiries and referrals. Pediatric brain injury case management is complex, and with the increased amount of cases every year, resources that connect clients to communities need to be expanded. Without Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley, there are no other options for a child with a brain injury to receive the wrap-around support that we provide in our service area.”

A successful pediatric brain injury case management program involves the brain injury community, education, awareness, resource dissemination, and coalition building. Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley is looking forward to increasing these partnerships with other providers in the community so we can best serve the children and their families.

About Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley, Inc.

Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley, Inc. was founded in 2005 as a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization. Brain Injury Connections combines public funds administered through the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, as well as private resources to provide specialized services for people affected by brain injury in the Shenandoah Valley. Services are designed to meet the needs of the individuals we serve to maximize the person’s independence in the community.

Brain Injury Connections of the Shenandoah Valley provides community-based services for individuals affected by brain injury in the Shenandoah Valley. Services may include:

  • Case Management
  • Community Support Services (Life Skills Training)
  • Behavior Support Facilitation
  • Education, Outreach & Advocacy
  • Support Groups

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