Board narrows two community college presidential searches

Virginia’s Community CollegesCommittee certifies three finalists for Northern Virginia Community College presidency

The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Northern Virginia Community College. The finalists were among 80 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order, are Dr. Paul Broadie II of Orange, Connecticut; Dr. Anne M. Kress of Rochester, New York; and Dr. Joaquín G. Martínez of Hollywood, Florida.

“Northern Virginia Community College is one of our nation’s largest, most diverse, and most dynamic community colleges,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “That’s reflected in the pool of candidates who applied for this presidency and the group of finalists moving on to the next step. These are seasoned and successful higher education leaders, and each of them is ready for the unique opportunities and challenges of leading Northern Virginia Community College. We’re excited for the college community to learn more about what they offer.”

Broadie is currently the president of two, independent Connecticut institutions: Gateway Community College in New Haven and Housatonic Community College in Bridgeport. He has nearly 30 years of higher education experience. Broadie began his career in 1990 as an admissions counselor at Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, New York. Two years later, at the same institution, he became an assistant coordinator of one of the college’s extension centers. He moved on to the State University of New York (SUNY) at New Paltz where he became an admissions advisor in 1997; an academic support coordinator nearly a year later; and an assistant dean of admissions/multi-cultural recruitment coordinator in 2000. Broadie became the director of the Ossining Extension Center for Westchester Community College, in Valhalla, New York, in 2001. He moved to Orange County Community College, in Middletown, New York, where he became the associate vice president of extension centers in 2002, and the vice president for Student Services in 2005. He became the president of Housatonic Community College in 2015, and took on the additional role of president at Gateway Community College in 2017. Broadie earned a bachelor’s degree from Mercy College; a master’s degree from Long Island University, in Brooklyn, New York; and a doctorate from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado.

Kress is currently the president of Monroe Community College in Rochester, New York. She has 30 years of community college experience. Her career began in 1989 at Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville, Florida as an adjunct instructor of English. She rose through the ranks at that institution becoming an associate professor in 1994; a department chair in 1998; the Title III project director in 2000; an associate vice president in 2002; and the provost and vice president for Academic Affairs in 2005. She became the president of Monroe Community College in 2009. Kress is serving her second term on the board of directors of the American Association of Community Colleges and as a member of the Presidents’ Trust of the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Kress earned two bachelor’s degrees, a master’s degree, and a doctorate from the University of Florida.

Martínez is currently the district vice provost for Institutional Effectiveness at Miami Dade College. He has more than 25 years of education experience, including a decade of community college experience. Martínez began as a high school Spanish, French, and Italian teacher in Miami-Dade County Schools in 1993. He became an adjunct professor at Nova Southeastern University, in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, in 2004. He moved to Albizu University, in Doral, Florida, where he became an associate professor in 2005; and the professor, director of the college’s School of Education in 2006. He moved to Miami Dade College in 2010 to become a department chair and steadily rose through the institution’s ranks becoming an associate dean and then associate provost in 2013; the dean of Faculty & Student Services in 2015; president of the Hialeah Campus in 2016; and president of the Wolfson Campus and Virtual College in 2017. This past summer, he assumed the district vice provost role he holds today.  Martínez earned a bachelor’s degree from Middlebury College in Vermont; a master’s degree from Nova Southeastern University; and a doctorate from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida.  

The three finalists seek to become the college’s sixth permanent president, and will succeed Dr. Melvyn D. Schiavelli, who has served as the college’s interim president since spring. The finalists will each visit the college in the coming weeks to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Established in 1964, Northern Virginia Community College is the largest public institution of higher education in the Commonwealth of Virginia and one of America’s largest community colleges. NOVA enrolls more than 75,000 students at its six campuses in Alexandria, Annandale, Loudoun, Manassas, Springfield and Woodbridge, and through the Extended Learning Institute.

Three finalists for Virginia Highlands Community College presidency

The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Virginia Highlands Community College. The finalists were among nearly 70 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order, are Dr. Marcia Conston of Charlotte, North Carolina; Dr. Adam C, Hutchison of Elm Mott, Texas; and Dr. Herbert H.J. Riedel of Andalusia, Alabama.

“This presidential search is attracting an impressive breadth and depth of talented candidates and that’s no surprise,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Virginia Highlands Community College is poised for tremendous progress. The college has a top-quality faculty and staff and it serves a dynamic rural community. I’m excited about what the future has in store for VHCC.”

Conston has worked in higher education for more than 30 years. She began her career as the director of Institutional Research at Jackson State University, in Mississippi in 1987. She went to Benedict College, in Columbia, South Carolina in 1994 to become the vice president for Institutional Effectiveness. In 2001, she became the vice president for Enrollment and Student Success Services at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, North Carolina – the position at which she currently works. Conston has also taught throughout her career, serving as a part-time associate professor at Benedict College in 1995-1996, and as an adjunct instructor at Wingate University for two years beginning in 2012. As an evaluator for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), Conston has evaluated 14 institutions for reaccreditation, including two Virginia community colleges.  She holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Jackson State University in Mississippi; a master’s degree from Hood Theological Seminary in Salisbury, North Carolina; and a doctorate from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Hutchison has nearly 20 years of higher education experience. He spent most of his early career at Texas State Technical College (TSTC) in Harlingen, Texas, where he served as an Aviation Maintenance Technology senior instructor and department chair (2000); associate vice president of its Corporate College (2006); the college’s chief of staff (2009); and its provost and vice president for Student Learning (2011). Hutchison moved to the TSTC in Waco, Texas in 2014 where he worked as the college’s provost and vice president for Student Learning for eight months before transferring to the TSTC System Office to become the associate vice chancellor for Student Learning. In 2016, he returned to TSTC Waco to be the college’s provost.  Hutchison holds an associate and bachelor’s degree from Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina; a master’s degree from Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia; and a doctorate from Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

Riedel has worked in higher education for 35 years. He began as a lecturer at Bowling Green State University, in Ohio, in 1984. A year later, he became an assistant professor at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1992 Riedel became a faculty member at Trident Technical College in Charleston. He moved to Tri-County Technical College in Pendleton, South Carolina where he became a department head in 1998 and a division chair in 2000. Riedel moved to the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, Florida, in 2004 to become the deputy director of the Nanoscience Technology Center. In 2005, he became the vice president for Instruction and Student Development at Northeast Texas Community College in Mt. Pleasant, Texas. He became the president of Lurleen B. Wallace Community College in Andalusia, Alabama in 2009– the position from which he recently retired. Riedel holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Pretoria in Pretoria, South Africa; and a master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada.

The three finalists seek to become the college’s seventh permanent president, and will succeed Dr. Charlie White, who has served as the college’s interim president for nearly a year. The finalists will each visit the college in in the coming weeks to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Virginia Highlands Community College provides high-quality education and related services for residents throughout its Southwest Virginia region, which includes the city of Bristol, Virginia; Washington County and the western part of Smyth County. VHCC is committed to teaching, learning & community building, and serves more than 2500 students, offering more than 80 academic areas of study.





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