Virginia State Police still seeking leads in Alicia Showalter Reynolds murder case

Alicia Showalter ReynoldsDespite the passage of more than two decades and having pursued more than 10,000 tips, the Virginia State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s Culpeper Field Office is still confident that the information is still out there to solve the disappearance and murder of Alicia Showalter Reynolds.

March 2, 1996, was the last time Ms. Reynolds, 25, was last seen alive driving along Route 29 from Baltimore, Md. to Charlottesville, Va. when she disappeared. Her vehicle, a Mercury Tracer, was found abandoned later that same day in Culpeper County. Two months later, her remains were discovered in a field that had recently been cleared of trees in the rural community of Lignum, Va.

According to witnesses who observed Ms. Reynolds’ white Mercury parked on the southbound shoulder of Route 29 on March 2, 1996, a white male, approximately 35-45 years old with a medium build and light to medium brown hair was stopped out with her vehicle. The man, described as between 5’10’ to 6’0 tall, was driving a dark-colored pickup truck, possibly a green Nissan.

As news spread about Ms. Reynolds’ abduction, several other female subjects came forward advising that a white male had either stopped them or attempted to stop them while they were traveling along Route 29 in Culpeper County.

State police remain hopeful that this case will come to a successful resolution and continue to encourage the public to come forward with any information related to the investigation. Anyone with information pertaining to the abduction and murder of Alicia Showalter Reynolds is asked to contact the Virginia State Police Culpeper Division toll-free at 1-800-572-2260, or the Bureau of Criminal Investigation toll-free at 1-888-300-0156 or by e-mail at bci-culpeper@vsp.virginia.gov.

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