VCU event to explore future of AirBnB in Virginia

vcuLegislators, lawyers and faculty experts will convene at the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth University as part of a panel discussion on concerns and opportunities related to companies such as AirBnB and the barter economy.

The panel discussion, “AirBnB and the Barter Economy: What’s the Future in Virginia?” will be held Tuesday, April 19, from 3-5 p.m. in the University Student Commons Theater, 907 Floyd Ave. The event will be free and open to the public. The barter economy and how Virginia will treat or authorize companies such as AirBnB – which allows property owners to rent out rooms, apartments or homes for short-term stays – has been a hot topic of debate in the General Assembly.

“Whether to regulate AirBnB and other real estate enterprises is a public policy issue in Virginia that has profound implications,” said Meghan Gough, Ph.D., chair of the Urban and Regional Studies and Planning program. “The Wilder School believes it’s important to convene experts and explore the many components of this ongoing issue.”

Pia Trigiani, a real estate attorney and founding partner of MercerTrigiani law firm in Alexandria, will moderate the discussion. Trigiani is a leading authority on common interest ownership community associations.

Panelists include:

  • State Sen. Tommy Norment, R-James City, senate majority leader and co-chair of the Senate Finance Committee.
  • Edward Mullen, partner at the law firm Reed Smith who focuses on administrative issues before state agencies, the General Assembly and Virginia’s congressional delegation.
  • Elsie Harper-Anderson, Ph.D., assistant professor of Urban and Regional Studies and Planning at VCU and an expert in economic development and entrepreneurship.
  • Nancy Morris, Ph.D., assistant professor of criminal justice at VCU and an authority on crime prevention and policing.

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