jump to example.com
newsletter linked in
Tag: earth talk

Divest

Divestment and fossil fuels

The climate movement has embraced divestment—that is, ditching stocks, bonds or investment funds deemed unethical or morally ambiguous—given how effective the tactic was in helping topple Apartheid in South Africa by shaming the companies still willing to do business there.


Smokestack

Health impact of coal

Coal combustion plants account for more than half of Americans’ electric power generation. According to Coal’s Assault on Human Health, a report by the non-profit Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR), coal combustion releases mercury, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and other substances known to be hazardous to human health.


mcaf

Moms Clean Air Force: Naptime activists unite!

Moms Clean Air Force (MCAF) is a community of 400,000+ parents working to combat air pollution and respond to the climate change crisis.


sunscreen

Sunscreens get safer

The ingredients in some common chemical-based sunscreens are known to cause allergic reactions for some people and have been linked to reproductive and behavioral problems in animal studies.


tv

Televisions bigger and greener than ever?

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, Americans’ 275 million television sets burn through some 65 billion kilowatt hours of energy each year, representing four to five percent of U.S. household electricity consumption.


microbeads

Microbeads and marine pollution

Can brushing your teeth or using an exfoliating face or body wash be an act of pollution? Perhaps so, because over 1,000 personal care products contain tiny plastic “microbeads,” each about a half millimeter in diameter.


cheetah

Better living through conservation genetics

Traditionally, conservation biologists have relied on field observation and sample and statistical analysis to help them understand the dynamics behind species loss.


salmon

What fish can we eat?

Between mercury poisoning, overfishing and the environmental impacts of fish farms or “aquaculture,” some might expect to see a “Proceed with Caution” sign above seafood counters soon.


griz

What is being done to protect grizzly bears?

Before European colonization of North America, upwards of 50,000 grizzly bears—also known as brown bears—roamed free across what is now the continental United States.


couch

Moving beyond flame retardants

Putting flame retardants in furniture seemed like a good idea back in the 1970s to help protect against the risk of fire, but our insistence on safety has come back to haunt us.


earth-new

Assessing the risks of genetically engineered crops

Earth Talk examines the potential health and environmental impacts of so many genetically engineered organisms in our food supply.


earth-new

Earth Talk: Should plastic bags be banned?

California made big news recently when it announced the first statewide ban on plastic shopping bags set to kick in during the middle of 2015. Beginning in July, large grocery stores, pharmacies and other food retailers in the Golden State will no longer be able to send shoppers home with plastic bags, while convenience markets, liquor stores and other small food retailers will join the ranks a year later.


earth-new

Earth Talk: Are fuel cell cars green?

Fuel cell cars have not caught on and skeptics wonder if they ever will. One big hurdle is that creating hydrogen fuel turns out to be highly inefficient compared to other readily available fuels.


earth-new

Earth Talk: Is organic agriculture sustainable?

Dr. Henry I. Miller, former director of the Office of Biotechnology at the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, argues that conventional farming—which uses synthetic pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers and often genetically modified (GM) seed stock to maximize yields—is actually better for the environment, producing more food and using less water compared to organic farming.


earth-new

Earth Talk: The bright future of wind power

Hydroelectric sources of power dwarf other forms of renewable energy, but wind power has been a dominant second for years, and continues to show “hockey stick” growth moving forward.