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DVDs of “Heroin: The Hardest Hit” now available

mark herringAttorney General Mark Herring announced today that DVDs of “Heroin: The Hardest Hit,” an award-winning documentary on the impact of heroin and prescription drugs on the Commonwealth of Virginia, are now available through the Office of Attorney General.

Schools, faith-based organizations, community organizations, civic groups, sports leagues, and others can request a free DVD featuring either the full 43-minute film, or a shorter 30-minute film designed for easy presentation in schools.

Anyone interested in receiving a DVD copy of “Heroin: The Hardest Hit,” streaming the film online, or planning a screening in their community with the assistance of the Office of Attorney General should visit www.HardestHitVA.com.

“This film really shows the realities of heroin and prescription drug abuse in Virginia,” said Attorney General Herring. “We let those who have been impacted tell their own stories, whether it’s young people in recovery, parents who lost a child, or law enforcement and health professionals fighting to keep up with a problem that is affecting Virginians of every background, age, and race. The result is a powerful portrayal of how quickly these dangerous drugs can take over, and it’s a message that every Virginia family needs to hear.”

“Heroin: The Hardest Hit” premiered in December 2015 at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. It features Virginians sharing their own stories of addiction, overdose, and recovery, as well as powerful testimony from the families and friends of young people who lost their lives to a fatal heroin overdose. In the six months since it premiered, the film has been viewed more than 60,000 times online, and more than a dozen screening events have been held around the Commonwealth.

Attorney General Herring has made combating the heroin and prescription opioid epidemic a top priority, attacking the problem with a multifaceted approach that includes enforcementeducation, prevention, and legislation to encourage reporting of overdoses in progress, expand the availability of naloxone, and expand access to the Prescription Monitoring Program.

 

 
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