AccuWeather: March snow to threaten Northeast

April warmth to fuel widespread severe weather outbreaks

newspaperPunxsutawney Phil failed to see his shadow on Feb. 2, 2016, indicating an early start to spring for the United States. The decision marks only the 18th time Pennsylvania’s most famous groundhog hasn’t seen his shadow since the tradition began in 1887.

For the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, AccuWeather meteorologists are concerned for just the opposite, as cold air and the potential for snow will linger into the start of March. Elsewhere, springlike severe weather isn’t predicted to become widespread until April.

 

Cold air, snow possible for Mid-Atlantic, Northeast into March

Warm weather lovers in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast will have to be patient, as winter plans to linger into March across both regions.

Cold air and stormy weather will take the stage from late February into the start of March, opening the door for a potential late-winter snowstorm.

“There could be a last surge of winter before we see the transition into spring,” AccuWeather Long-Range Meteorologist Paul Pastelok said. “For the Northeast, there’s still an opportunity for some snow, although there’s a higher chance that we’ll see a cold snap rather than a big snowstorm.”

A quick warmup will follow, however, allowing milder air to arrive faster than it has in the past two years for both regions.

“A lack of arctic air in the region and the sun getting higher and higher in the sky will make it feel pretty nice, I think, by mid-March in the Northeast,” Pastelok said.

Through April, the weather pattern will lend itself to the occasional damp and dreary day before a turnaround in May.

“Big cities around the Great Lakes will have nice weather for outdoor projects and early planting in May,” Pastelok said. “Expect mild temperatures, frequent sunshine and cooler nights.”

May could also yield drought concerns for the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley, prompting some early season heat. During the same month, the threat for severe weather will loom for the Mid-Atlantic.