ACC teams turn in another impressive NCAA report card

accAthletic teams from Atlantic Coast Conference institutions continue to be among the top percentage of those at Division I colleges and universities that meet standards and excel academically, as reflected by Academic Progress Rate (APR) data released by the NCAA on Wednesday.

Each Division I institution is held accountable for the academic progress of its student-athletes through the APR, a team-based metric that accounts for the eligibility and retention of each student-athlete, each term.

The Committee on Academic Performance oversees the Academic Performance Program, which sets policies and recommends legislative changes to the Board of Directors, which has the final say on rules changes in Division I.

Beginning with 2012-13 championships, teams were required to post a minimum 900 four-year average APR or a 930 average over the most recent two years to be eligible to participate. For this year’s championships, teams were required to earn a 930 four-year average APR or a 940 average over the most recent two years to participate in championships. In 2015-16 and beyond, teams must earn a four-year APR of 930 to compete in championships.

ACC Highlights include:
•    All 58 ACC football, men’s basketball, women’s basketball and baseball programs exceeded the required 930 APR average
•    12 ACC baseball teams are above the 969 national APR average
•    12 women’s basketball teams are above the national 973 APR average
•    11 men’s basketball teams are above the Division I 961 APR average
•    12 ACC football teams are above the FBS 960 APR average
•    No ACC teams are subject to APR penalties for the fourth straight year

The ACC’s strong showing comes one week after 82 league teams received APR recognition awards, the most of any Power 5 conference.

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